≡ Menu

15 Ways to Stay Organised at Work During 2015

15 ways to stay organised at work

This post is part of a blogger link up with my friends at Elite Blogging Academy, which is a blogging course I’m currently taking (and that’s my affiliate link).

Start 2015 as you mean to go on with these tips for getting organised at work. Make this your most organised work year ever! Well, you can try, can’t you? Who knows what state we’ll be in by February…

Organise your diary

1. Block out half a day a month
Book a meeting with yourself for half a day a month and call it ‘process review’. This is your reflection time for how things are working. Think about what you could be doing differently to get more done. Refine your processes. I use a Wednesday afternoon for this as Fridays are too liable to be spent dealing with last-minute tasks for the week.

2. Book time to write reports
Book a recurring meeting to schedule the time in your diary for reporting. I have to write weekly project reports and I have half an hour every Thursday morning set aside for this. This works for any recurring tasks such as updating project risk logs or anything else that you might ‘overlook’ if you don’t have time deliberately set aside.

3. Set up calendar reminders
Forward-schedule anything you need to be aware of this year such as conferences or team members’ birthdays. You can set alerts to remind yourself that these dates are coming.

4. Create a To Do list
You’ve probably got your last To Do list from the end of last year, but rewrite it. What has been stuck on there for the last six months that you have no intention of doing this year? Ditch it. Streamline as much as you can and put your priority tasks for January at the top. I put longer-term actions in the back of my notebook so I can split them off the daily To Do list (and because I’m not wired enough to have an online task management system).

Organise your team

5. Book team meetings
Yep, get them in the diary now. If you don’t, you risk de-prioritising them in favour of plodding on with the work. Put them in and invite the right people. You can always cancel them if they aren’t required.

6. Review your resources
Have you got everyone you need to make your projects a success in 2015? What other resources do you need to secure? Review your resource gaps now so you can put forward a plan to either recruit or ‘borrow’ people from other departments so that you can achieve your objectives.

7. Book training
Actually, you can do this for yourself as well. While everyone is still thinking about New Year’s Resolutions and there is a training budget, get yourself and your team booked on the relevant courses. Even if they aren’t happening until much later in the year. Organise it now, pay for it and then forget about it until your pre-course work turns up. Otherwise you’ll never get round to scheduling that training.

Book your meetings, training and time out to reflect and catch up now.

Organise your projects

8. Agree your priority projects
Do you know what your priority work should be for 2015? Think about all the projects you have on the go or know are coming your way. It should be clear which is the priority but if not take advice from your manager. Knowing what is a priority will help you focus on the right tasks this year.

9. Sort your filing system
Set up your project filing systems for the year. Create new folders labelled with project names and dates. Grant access to new members of the team and remove access from old folders for people who have moved into different roles.

10. Check your templates
Many organizations update their financial templates from time-to-time. Check that you have the most recent templates for raising purchase orders, creating capital expenditure requests, preparing business cases and reporting accruals.

11. Put key project dates in your main diary
This might sound like duplication of effort – after all, you have a prpoject schedule to manage your critical project milestones. Why put them in your diary too? I put major events like training courses for end users in my Outlook calendar. It means I don’t double-book the resources required and I’ve got another reminder of what’s coming up on the project.

12. Book your meetings
As well as scheduling your team meetings, book all your Project Board or steering group meetings for the duration of your project. Project sponsors and senior executives are busy people so give them lots of notice for your upcoming meetings and decision points.

Organise your environment

13. Sort out your tech
Don’t start the year with a phone that doesn’t work. Upgrade your phone, get the IT help desk on speed dial, buy a new charger so you can always keep one in your bag. Gadgets are an essential part of office life now so make sure they work for you and don’t hold you up. Oh, and review these pointers on gadget etiquette so you don’t make a faux pas at work.

14. Give your team the tools they need
Make sure that your team members have the tools they need to do the job. If you don’t know what they are, ask the people involved. You could speed up a lot of tasks if only they had the right piece of kit. Get it on the procurement radar before the budgets run out later in the year.

15. Tidy your desk
Chuck out the Christmas cards, the novelty freebies you got from your last conference and the glossy brochures from suppliers you aren’t going to use. I found some receipts that should have been included in my expenses when I did this. Shred any confidential paperwork and put anything else in the recycling. Start the year with a clear workspace, ready to face the challenges of your first days back in the office.

Are any of these part of your New Year’s Resolutions? Let us know in the comments.

how to make 2015 the best year ever

 

HTML Code for EBA New Year Blogger Collaboration

1. How to Set and Keep Goals to Make This the Best Year Ever | Jen @ Girl in Garage

2. 15 Ways to Stay Organised at Work During 2015 | Elizabeth Harrin @ A Girl’s Guide to Project Management

3. How Personal Style Will Help You Achieve Goals Faster in 2015 | Cherene Francis @ Aura Image Consulting

4. Completing Those Unfinished Projects in the NEW YEAR | Angela Lerew @ Unexpected Elegance

5. 42 Ways to Practice Perfectly & Become an Expert at Almost Anything | Amy Garro @ 13 Spools

6. Easy Exercises to do on a Cruise Ship | Amanda Woods @ Adventures All Around

7. 10 Simple Ways to Eat Healthier This Year | Dawn @ Reveal Natural Health

8. 31 Days to a More Fabulous You | Julie Bonner @ Mom Fabulous

9. How to Make This the Best Gardening Year Ever | Kendra Spencer @ a Sonoma Garden

10. 5 Ways to Make this Your Best Monarch Season…Ever! | Tony Gomez @ Monarch Butterfly Garden

11. 12 Scriptures for Goals and Guidance | Julie @ Loving Christ Ministries

12. How to Build a Starter Emergency Fund in 30 Days or Less | Jackie Beck @ The Debt Myth

13. Family Verse of the Week Challenge for 2015 | Jamie Yonash @ Life is Sweeter By Design

14. Hot Work at Home Jobs for 2015 | Holly Hanna @ The Work at Home Woman

15.  A Year of Intention | Hilary Bernstein @ Accidentally Green

16. 2015: Our Best Year Yet | Ashley @ Leaving the Rut

17. Create a Better Life Story | Bronwen Warner @ Tummy Time and Beyond

18. Get Ready to Get MDfit | Tom and Anne @ Eat & Be Fit

19. 5 Free Ways to Learn Something New This Year | Sarah Fuller @ Earning and Saving with Sarah Fuller

20. Healthy Leek Soup | Mirlandra @ Mirlandra’s Kitchen

21. Health Resolutions: Baby Steps to a New You | Ellen Christian @ Confessions of an Overworked Mom

22. 5 Ways Busy Moms Can Get Motivated to Work Out | Diane Nassy @ philZENdia

23. Be Prepared for the New Year | Jennifer Dunham Starr @ The Memory Journalists

24. 3 Steps to a Healthier Life in 2015 | Joe Goodwill @Average Joe Cyclist

25. New Year’s Resolution: Cook More Often! | Kim Pawell @ Something New for Dinner

26. I Should What? 28 Ways to be Happier | Karen Young @ Hey Sigmund

27. 9 Ways to Get Healthier In The New Year | Amy Maus @ Home and Farm Sense

28. In 2015 Resolve to Take Control of Your Money | Kristia @ Family Balance Sheet

29. Eucharisteo: A Year of Thanksgiving | Lani Padilla @ Simply Fresh Vintage

30. No More Tears at IEP Meetings: Make This Your Best Year Ever! | Lisa Lightner @ A Day In Our Shoes

31. Learn to Save Money on Groceries | Melissa Buckles @ Everyday Savvy

32. How to Achieve Your New Year’s Resolution – For Real This Time! | Michelle @ Dishes and Dust Bunnies

33. 52 Weeks to a Better You: Week 1 – Go to Bed Early | Mindi Cherry @ Moms Need to Know

34. Food Street: How a Community Has Joined Forces to Start a Street Farm | Sam Walker @ Bubble ‘N Squeak

35. Organizing Coupons with the Binder Method | Sara Steigerwald @ Sisters Shopping on a Shoe String

36. How to Make This Year the Happiest Yet | Shambray @ Shambray.com

37. A New Year, A New You | Sharon Rowe @ How to Get Organized at Home

38. 5 Ways to Get Paid for Losing Weight This Year | Anna @ Real Ways to Earn Money at Home

39. Tips for Successful Whole30 | Deanna Michaels @ From This Kitchen Table

40. 75 Ways to Be Healthier in 2015 | Maryea Flaherty @ Happy Healthy Mama

41. How to Make 2015 the Best Year Ever! | Jennifer @ My Boys & Their Toys

Bonus links:

Fashion Resolutions: How to Add Style to Any Outfit | Ellen Christian @ The Socialite’s Closet

18 comments

10 Killer interview questions for project managersInterviewing for project management jobs is something I have had to do but I don’t find it easy. How do you know what to ask? And how do you use what is normally a really short period of time to let the candidate show themselves in the best possible light?

Added to that is the fact that it’s easy for candidates to come up with answers to many of the standard questions because there are so many books about recruiting and interviewing. They have plenty of time to rehearse their answers, so the whole thing can feel like a box ticking exercise.

I’ve put together my 10 killer interview questions for hiring a project manager. Next time you have to recruit someone for your project team, why not try some of these?

1. What don’t you want to work on?

Good because: There are always bits of jobs we don’t like, but project managers typically work on the projects that they are assigned. It’s fine to have preferences, but you’re looking for someone who can respond to business needs even if that isn’t their top choice of project.

Bad response: “I like to choose the projects I work on, and I only really want to do the digital media ones. That’s OK, isn’t it?”

2. If you had to rate project management as a career, from 1-10 how would you rate it?

Good because: This will show you how they value their career and whether they see themselves progressing in a PM role. Ask them why they chose that rating.

Bad response: “I’d score it a 1 because I’m only doing this to fill in time before I can get a proper job.”

3. What’s the most important thing for a project manager to do?

Good because: It will show you their priorities and whether they have actually thought about what a project manager does. It will also demonstrate whether they are a good cultural fit for your team. If you have a strong focus on process and they think the most important thing is to be flexible and adapt processes as you go, then you probably won’t get on.

Bad response: “Well, it’s mainly admin, isn’t it?”

4. What do you spend the most time doing each day?

Good because: This gives you an indication of how they do their job. Someone who spends all day at the PC may suit your environment, or you might be looking for a project manager who gets out and visits clients most days of the week. Remember that they might be prepared to do something other than what they do now, so if you hear something that doesn’t fit with the post you are recruiting for, don’t rule them out before exploring this further.

Bad response: “Facebook.”

5. How do you work with sponsors? How do you manage up?

Good because: Managing up means working well with people more senior than you. Project managers do this all the time, so it’s good to find out how they make those relationships work.
bigstock-We-are-Hiring-Sign-35317226 bigger
Bad response: “I prefer not to get my sponsor involved. They’re typically a figurehead, so I don’t bother them.”

6. When was the last time you didn’t delegate and what happened?

Good because: This will help you work out if they are happy to be honest and tell you about a time that something went wrong. This shows their capacity to learn from mistakes and how they deal with information overload. Delegating work packages is key to project work and you’ll want to hire someone who understands that.

Bad response: “I never delegate – it’s easier to do it all myself.”

7. What was the most difficult ethical decision you’ve had to make on a project?

Good because: It can demonstrate their awareness of PMI Code of Ethics and even if they aren’t aware of that, their general approach to work. You can also use it to open up an interesting discussion and allow you to judge how they will fit into your business culture.

Bad response: “I awarded a contract to my cousin once, even though he was the most expensive. I did get a good holiday out of the kickback though.”

8. What criteria are you using to find your next job?

Good because: It will show you what’s important to them at work: green credentials, career progression, work/life balance, working for a big brand etc. It will also tell you if they are actively job hunting or whether they saw your ad and couldn’t resist (either is fine).

Bad response: “Salary, expense policy and the chance to travel abroad.”

9. How have you improved project management processes at your current firm?

Good because: Not everyone has the chance to work on business critical, exciting projects that make for a great CV, but everyone has the chance to offer some suggestions for improvements (even if they aren’t taken up). Look for someone who has ideas and who isn’t afraid to put them forward.

Bad response: “It’s all pretty rubbish there but I haven’t bothered to do anything about it as there’s no point.”

10. What creative problem solving techniques do you use?

Good because: It’s worth probing the technical skills of candidates. Can they talk knowledgably about fishbone diagrams, De Bono’s thinking hats, role play? Branch out to talk about the last project issue they resolved with creative thinking.

Bad response: “I tend to solve problems myself without involving the team.”

What other interview questions do you recommend using? Let us know in the comments below!

5 comments
Will Kintish

Will Kintish

Is your summer stretching ahead with one cocktail networking event after another? No? Mine neither. However, there is always some kind of requirement to met new people as a project manager, even if it’s just your next project team. And as author Will Kintish says, networking is simply about building relationships. I asked him for some more tips on getting started confidently.

Will, let’s start at the beginning. How would you define networking?

Networking is something everyone on the planet does every day. It is simply building relationships. Every day we either reinforce existing relationships or we make new ones when we attend business and social events. There are 3 key steps to building long-term meaningful new relationships: know, like and trust.

  1. Get to know someone when you attend events. Every relationship has to start somewhere often with a smile, a handshake and the swopping of names and initial information.
  2. You have to build rapport early in any new relationship and get people to like you otherwise the relationship will never get off the ground. Find common ground, ask good questions, listen carefully and be genuinely interested.
  3. To create long-term meaningful relationships you and I need to build trust. This can be done quickly if after meeting someone new you offer to send them something useful to them you actually do it and do it quickly. Speed stuns. If you agree to call, email or broker an introduction again do it within 24 hours or when both parties agree a time which is suitable for both.

Why is now the right time for project managers to be thinking about networking?

As business activities are beginning to grow again, more opportunities are bound to occur. Project managers should be thinking about their career and business development prospects with an approach which is proactive rather than reactive.

In today’s highly competitive world, being a confident and effective networker sets you apart from the crowd. You become more visible, always feel in control and will always create more business opportunities than the average.

However technically capable one is at one’s job in today’s crowded marketplace, each person is generally a secret — particularly early on in one’s career. When you attend events people get to know who you are and what you do. Conversely, you find out what others do and how you can create mutually-beneficial business relationships. People buy people before they buy your service and when you build rapport easily people will want to do business with you rather than your competition.

So you advocate face-to-face as the best way of networking?

Of all the different ways to communicate, the original face-to-face method has to be, and always will be, the best way to build true relationships.  The electronic channels of communication are here to stay but will never replace the smile, the handshake, the eye contact and the genuine interest, asking intelligent and searching questions for starting a true relationship.

Why do you think people don’t like or fear networking? It’s not that hard, is it?

From my experience the vast majority do not like or fear networking and yes, it isn’t that hard. As I said at the start, it is simply building relationships. When I started out as a trainee accountant no-one used the word: it was called talking in those days!

My extensive research tells me people have 3 key fears:

1. Fear of Rejection

“Will anyone talk to me?” “Will I be included?” “Have I got the right to be in this room full of more experienced people?”

I share my experience and suggest when you are welcoming and warm to others the chances of rejection are slight. The tiny percentage of rude ignorant people should be dismissed and left alone.

2. Fear of the Unknown

“They are all strangers; what can I say to them?” “How do I know who to approach?” “What is going to happen at this event?”

I explain that even starting a conversation with a stranger you will find something in common. It is to do with the event itself. ‘Who do you know here?’ ‘What are you hoping to learn from this conference?’ ‘Where have you travelled from?’

Every room has open-formatted and closed-formatted groups. Look for the person alone or groups in open format and approach with a courteous, ‘Please may I join you?’ ‘May I introduce myself?’

3. Fear of failure and embarrassment

Many less-experienced professionals feel that these fears are caused by getting involved in conversations where they believe or realise that the other person knows more about a topic than they do. I simply suggest you use the 3 letter acronym TED to find out more:

Tell me what you mean…

Explain how….

Describe exactly where….

OK, it’s proof time. Do you have an example of where you or a connection have benefited directly from networking. Otherwise it’s just idle chit chat over cheap wine isn’t it?

I have literally hundreds of examples. People looking for their next career move have been on my open courses and mentioned this fact. A fellow delegate has said ‘I’m looking for someone like you’. New positions have been filled.

I attended a charity event where I presented. I met Nigel. We have become firm business associates.

I belong to a breakfast networking club where I use most of my fellow breakfasters for my services. Finding reliable suppliers is as important as gaining new clients.

Business Networking book coverThanks for those examples – you probably don’t get cheap wine at your breakfast club! Any closing comments?

Networking is a fundamental business skill. If you don’t network, or do it unwillingly or badly, it won’t stop you being successful.

BUT when you are known for being good at what you do, and you are an effective and confident networker, I believe any goal you set yourself will be achieved.

 

Business Networking – The Survival Guide by Will Kintish (Pearson) is out now, priced £12.99, from Amazon and all good book shops.

1 comment

Are you really managing information overload?

Are you really managing information overload?

At the social media webinar I gave at the end of last year for the PMI LEAD Community of Practice one of the main themes coming out of the comments and questions from participants was how to deal with the extra information channels that social media tools offer. People generally seem quite worried about how to handle information overload, to the point that it creates a panic or stress and they stop using tools that could actually be quite helpful if they were only used in the right way.

Graham Allcott talks about this in his book, How To Be A Productivity Ninja. It’s a time-management-y book but it’s really about how to get organised and stay organised. He says that information overload isn’t about having too much information at all. Instead, it’s a symptom of other sorts of stress.

Information overload vs. lack of control

He suggests that when we talk about feeling as if we are overloaded with information, what we really mean is that we can’t control it. And as project managers, controlling stuff is what we do! So it’s natural to feel as if we are losing control when there are lots more information sources and lots more ways for people to interact with each other rather than going through us.

However, this isn’t information overload, it’s an internal struggle with being out of control.

Information overload vs. looking foolish

Allcott also says that people talk about information overload when really what they mean is ‘I don’t understand the new technology and I’m going to look stupid if I admit that.’ Social media-style and collaboration tools are new for many people, and there is a learning curve to picking up using any new software product.

But this isn’t information overload, it’s worrying about looking foolish.

Information overload vs. Imposter Syndrome

When it feels as if everyone else knows what they are doing and you are just treading water to get by, and you are waiting for everyone to realise that you have no idea how to manage projects after all, that’s Imposter Syndrome. (You can read more about Imposter Syndrome and my ebook on the subject here.) It can manifest itself as information overload, because everyone else seems to be handling all the extra data wonderfully and you are struggling.

Ninja book coverThat isn’t information overload, it’s the belief that everyone else has cracked it.

Information overload vs. ambiguity

Allcott talks about the fact that lots of ways for data to arrive means that much of the data is likely to be vague or ambiguous. There is also ambiguity in the way in which we should deal with it. Is it an action for us? For someone else? If it’s a broadcast message how do we find out who is actually picking it up and doing that project task?

But that isn’t information overload, it’s worrying about how to deal with uncertainty.

Information overload vs. conflict

Things happen quickly on many projects, and there are often change requests that get processed at short notice. These could arrive via one of many channels. There are also often conflicting priorities, and lots of stakeholders who all have their own views. Given that they now have more channels than ever to complain to you about the project, the team or why their favourite change got rejected, it can certainly feel as if you are being overloaded with communication.

However, that isn’t information overload, it’s dealing with conflict.

Allcott recommends that you put systems in place to deal with all of this. Use a good project management change process. Sort out conflicts before they escalate. Deal with feeling out of control by putting in place To Do lists or other systems that help you manage effectively. Read my ebook about Imposter Syndrome (OK, he doesn’t recommend that one – that’s me!). The more you can systemise, the easier it will be to deal with all the information channels.

“Remember that most information is close to worthless.”

– Graham Allcott

Also recognise what is causing the stress: is it really that you have too much information crossing your desk and you don’t know what to do with it? Or is there another underlying cause that, if fixed, would help you manage all this communication effectively? He believes (as do I) that we can manage ourselves and the information effectively if we are smart about it, although he does say: “Remember that most information is close to worthless.”

With that in mind, what are you going to do to filter out the useless stuff, systemise the useful stuff and get yourself back in control of your project information channels?

2 comments

poster 5 more things

Last month I wrote about 5 things you should know as a new project manager. There’s actually more than 5 that newbie project managers should be paying attention to, so here are another 5!

1. Know what’s a showstopper

What is going to kill your project? Some problems aren’t that big a deal. But some are huge and will cause significant issues. Knowing which is which is partly down to your professional judgement, and if you are new to projects you might doubt your own ability to make that call. Showstoppers are things that will prevent your project from achieving its objectives. If you hit a problem and you don’t know how serious it really is, talk to your project sponsor or a trusted colleague. Chances are, if you are worried, then they will be too.

2. Manage risk

Risks are things that could potentially cause problems (there are also risks that could potentially improve things, but that’s for another day). They haven’t yet, but they might. Don’t ignore them. The project manager’s role is to work out how to make these risks disappear or at least have less of an impact if they do happen.

Each project risk will need a management strategy and an action plan. Work with your team to establish what to do about them. You might not take any action for some smaller risks but for those that have the potential to give you a big headache you’ll want to look at creative solutions to make them go away.

What documents should your project have?

Project Initiation Document
Project Plan
Risk log
Issue log
Change log
Project Closure Document

There are plenty of others but these are the minimum.

3. Learn to cope when things go wrong

When problems do hit (and they will!), the best project managers deal with them calmly and professionally. If that isn’t your nature, you’ll have to work hard to give the impression of having everything under control. You set the tone for the team and they will take their lead from you. However disastrous the problem, don’t run around like a headless chicken screaming, “The sky is falling!” Sit down with some subject matter experts and come up with some solutions to the problem so you can present your project sponsor with a recommendation of how to deal with it.

4. Understand the benefits

What benefits will this project deliver? Every project task you do should contribute to achieving those. These days, companies don’t have the budget or resources to invest in projects that don’t deliver anything useful. And as business priorities change at a scary rate, today’s high profile, top priority project is tomorrow’s pointless exercise. Make sure you understand your project’s benefits and keep checking that they will be achieved and that the project does still align with current business strategy. If it doesn’t, it’s probably time for your project to be stopped and for you to work on something more worthwhile.

5. No one will understand your job

Finally, accept the fact that people outside of project management won’t understand what you do. If the project goes well, they’ll ask why they needed a project manager at all. If the project goes badly, be prepared for it to be all your fault. I have always found it hard to explain the role of a project manager. My job is to make it easy for other people to do their jobs, and if that doesn’t sound like a non-job then I don’t know what does.

If you can get a mentor, then get one. If you can’t, read everything you can, research good practices online, attend training and take some certificates. In fact, do all that even if you do have a mentor. You should never stop learning and developing professionally, even when you’ve got lots of experience and people are asking you to mentor them. Project management is basically about building good relationships with other people to get things done, and as every project and every person is different, there is always going to be something you can learn and take forward to your next piece of work.

11 comments

Do you need a project management degree?

Do you need a project management degree?Recently someone got in contact with me to ask about how to get into project management. I thought I’d repeat here what I said to her, in case anyone else finds it useful. She wrote:

I have been advised that you have to do a degree in a particular subject e.g. engineering, do project management training e.g. PMI, PRINCE2 etc and work your way up in order to become a project manager.  Is this true? On the other hand, I have been advised to do a degree in project management and do work experience in a particular field to build up your experience.

So, do you need a degree in project management to become a project manager?

Firstly, I should say that I don’t think you require a degree in a particular subject in order to become a project manager – both my degrees are in English Literature and I work as an IT project manager in the healthcare sector. But you will benefit from a project management qualification such as PMP, CAPM or PRINCE2 in order to get a job as a project manager.

Having said that, this might be different if you want to work in a non-office/non-generalist field such as architecture or civil engineering. For all that project management is mainly transferable skills I wouldn’t know where to start with building shopping centres or roads after the years doing what I do.

Personally, I think employers value work experience over a degree, so a degree in project management, while it will show that you have the technical and soft skills, will not ensure you a job. What I would do is this: get a degree in a subject I enjoy and could find work in, and then add project management as a specialism later through targeted work experience and certificates. Oh, that’s what I actually did do.

Having a degree is a useful back up in case you change your mind later about wanting to work in project management. If you really want a project management degree, there are lots of Masters level courses that offer professionals with experience the ability to codify that through academic and practical study. So if you do want to ‘prove’ your skills, I would suggest doing so at a later date with one of those once you have some work experience to your name. The risk of a undergraduate degree in project management is that you actually find out you don’t much like it after all and then you’re stuck with it.

 

Please note that this is my personal opinion and that I cannot give tailored career advice over email. I do have some resources for students here and you can find my views on whether CAPM or PRINCE2 is the right choice for you here.

13 comments

16 Essential Questions for Project Initiation

Find out the 16 most important questions to ask your team and stakeholders when you first start a project.

Free project issue log template

Keeping track of problems on projects is really important if you want to come across as a professional project manager. Download a free issue log template for your projects to help you track and manage those inevitable problems.

4 Management Styles for Giving Feedback

My style for giving feedback is one of positive praise. I say things like, “Great walking, Oliver!” and “Thanks for carrying your spoon to the table, Jack!” dozens of times each day. Positive praise is where you tell children exactly what they’ve done that you are pleased with instead of simply saying, “Well done!” An… Continue Reading->

Get Fit with the Lazy PM: Giveaway winner

Last month's giveaway was won by Niall from Limerick, Ireland. Niall wins a copy of Get Fit with the Lazy Project Manager (and I didn't manage to read it before I posted it off but a quick flick through tells me it's going to be great). Congratulations! This month's giveaway is for a copy of… Continue Reading->

9 Essential Project Documents

Project management can create a lot of paperwork, and it’s not always the stuff you want or need. Let’s talk about the essentials. Here are nine documents that no self-respecting project should be without.

Happy International Women’s Day!

Continue Reading->